How to write engaging product descriptions

A shopping screen on a smartphone is held in a woman's hand. She has a credit card on the other hand
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There’s a true art to writing engaging product descriptions in my professional opinion.  I came pretty late into it, as I focused on blog post and article writing as my main targets.  However, from the first product description I ever wrote, I knew that this was what I wanted to focus my career on as far as business content writing.  Here are some of the best tips that have helped me figure my way around the tricky world of writing product descriptions that actually sell products.

Love what you do

Remember, if you don’t like writing product descriptions, or you’re not interested in the products you’re writing about, or you just don’t like shopping (collective gasp), don’t try to write product descriptions!  The finished description won’t be compelling or entertaining, so if you decide that it just isn’t for you, that’s okay!

Tips on writing engaging product descriptions

  • Give it the focus it deserves: Sure descriptions are short and “easy” to do quickly, but there are a lot of details that you need to think of.  For example, in less than 200 words (typically), you need to draw in the reader, show off the selling features, explain why they need it, and drive them to buy it now.  Oh, and you gotta work in the keywords at the right density, too.  Don’t make it harder by rushing the process to meet a deadline.  Give yourself time to get it right.
  • Ask for sample descriptions: If you are working with a customer and their shop for the first time, one of the most important details is to get a feel for what kind of description they are looking for.  Ask them to provide links to the right kind of product description they want and use that to guide you on whether or not you’re going to take on the job.  If the description instructions/samples are so specific there’s no room for creative flair, or they don’t seem like your style, tell them that.  It’s also a good idea to provide them with descriptions that you’ve written before, too, especially if they aren’t sure what kind of description style they want.  This can be done through past work from customers (with their permission) or a writing portfolio with self-generated samples.
  • Flip the table: Not literally, guys.  When you write and read over your description, pretend you’re a customer reading it.  Would you be compelled to buy the product?  If not, tweak it and try it again.  Repeat until you feel as though it’s got the presence that you’re looking for.  If it doesn’t grab your interest, it won’t grab your customer’s and it certainly won’t grab the interest of the fickle and judgemental customer!
  • Loosen the reigns: It can be nerve-wracking to write product descriptions for a new customer, especially if there is a potentially large, long-term contract on the line.  But, push the tension aside and let loose on the reigns!  Your customer wants a conversation-like, exciting paragraph or two, not a stilted, cardboard description they could have copied off of a cereal box.  You need to relax into your tone even with professional product descriptions.  Remember: you know what you’re doing!

Shopping online isn’t going away

Realistically speaking, online shopping isn’t going anywhere, so product description writing is going to be only getting more popular and more in-demand with eCommerce sellers.  So, get your name on the list of top quality product description writers.  It’ll be fun, engaging and you basically get to shop and be paid for it!  It doesn’t get much better for the professional business content writer looking for a change from long-form writing!

Business content writing

Kelterss View All →

Kelterss is an experienced freelance business writer and holds a Bachelor of Arts in English with a concentration in Creating Writing. Having served over 1100 customers while maintaining a 4.9/5 star rating, Kelterss is looking to focus her professional services in writing product descriptions and blog posts.

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